My February Budget (Real Numbers)

person walking holding brown leather bag

Photo by Marten Bjork via Unsplash.com

Happy February everyone! I’m happy to say that I’m still on track to be #debtfree by the end of March, though my budget will be tighter due to less income than anticipated and an added expense. Here are the numbers:

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As you can see, my income is $20 less per paycheck than I anticipated after lowering my 457 contributions. This means $40 less that I can put towards debt this month, which is difficult but not enough to derail my plans. I’ve added the “rollover” category for any money I have left over from January, which is $19 this month.

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I’ll be putting $1,350 into debt this month instead of the $1,382 I had planned last month, before I knew my exact takehome income. I’m fortunately still on track to be done with debt by the end of March.

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My savings are remaining the same for the time being– can’t wait to beef up my Iceland fund once I’m out of debt, though!

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As you can see, groceries and going out are the same amounts as last month.

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I lowered my miscellaneous/pocket money fund to make up for some of the difference in my budget.

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Still only paying $100/month for gas, and still not paying the tolls I used to. 🙂

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Rent and utilities are remaining the same as well.

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This is my newest expense: I finally got renter’s insurance! I should have had this for months, but somehow I forgot about it this whole time until my apartment complex reached out to me about it. Oops! Make sure you have renter’s insurance, people!

 

It will be tougher to be #debtfree by March due to these differences in my budget, but I’m not opposed to spending less in grocery/going out categories or even dipping into a savings fund if I need to, though I doubt it will come to that.

See anything you think I could spend less on? Let me know in the comments below! I’m always looking for better ways to budget.

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2 comments

  1. I was intrigued by this post because you use real numbers! Thanks for the nice and detailed breakdown. It’s awesome you don’t have to pay tolls anymore, I think you won’t notice the $40 eventually, and I wish you the best of luck with saving for Iceland (did you realize Tread Lightly, Retire Early wants to go there too?) She just did a nice post about her trip to Hawaii and mentioned Iceland at the end.

    Like

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